August 2024

Friday August 16

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Bartow Friday Fest Public
Recurs monthly

This is for anyone who wants to go to a block party. It’s o bserving and Q&A only. Solar scopes are welcome before sunset. Set up at Main St. & S Wilson Ave.
If you want to take a look around, someone will watch your scope for you. There’s usually some good food close by and music down the street.
The view is somewhat limited and there’s lots of light, but those who stop by, have some good questions, so, be ready with some good answers.
This is another event that has brought us new members.

September 2024

Friday September 20

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Bartow Friday Fest Public
Recurs monthly

This is for anyone who wants to go to a block party. It’s o bserving and Q&A only. Solar scopes are welcome before sunset. Set up at Main St. & S Wilson Ave.
If you want to take a look around, someone will watch your scope for you. There’s usually some good food close by and music down the street.
The view is somewhat limited and there’s lots of light, but those who stop by, have some good questions, so, be ready with some good answers.
This is another event that has brought us new members.

October 2024

Friday October 18

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Bartow Friday Fest Public
Recurs monthly

This is for anyone who wants to go to a block party. It’s o bserving and Q&A only. Solar scopes are welcome before sunset. Set up at Main St. & S Wilson Ave.
If you want to take a look around, someone will watch your scope for you. There’s usually some good food close by and music down the street.
The view is somewhat limited and there’s lots of light, but those who stop by, have some good questions, so, be ready with some good answers.
This is another event that has brought us new members.

November 2024

Friday November 15

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Bartow Friday Fest Public
Recurs monthly

This is for anyone who wants to go to a block party. It’s o bserving and Q&A only. Solar scopes are welcome before sunset. Set up at Main St. & S Wilson Ave.
If you want to take a look around, someone will watch your scope for you. There’s usually some good food close by and music down the street.
The view is somewhat limited and there’s lots of light, but those who stop by, have some good questions, so, be ready with some good answers.
This is another event that has brought us new members.

December 2024

Friday December 20

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Bartow Friday Fest Public
Recurs monthly

This is for anyone who wants to go to a block party. It’s o bserving and Q&A only. Solar scopes are welcome before sunset. Set up at Main St. & S Wilson Ave.
If you want to take a look around, someone will watch your scope for you. There’s usually some good food close by and music down the street.
The view is somewhat limited and there’s lots of light, but those who stop by, have some good questions, so, be ready with some good answers.
This is another event that has brought us new members.

January 2025

Friday January 17

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Bartow Friday Fest Public
Recurs monthly

This is for anyone who wants to go to a block party. It’s o bserving and Q&A only. Solar scopes are welcome before sunset. Set up at Main St. & S Wilson Ave.
If you want to take a look around, someone will watch your scope for you. There’s usually some good food close by and music down the street.
The view is somewhat limited and there’s lots of light, but those who stop by, have some good questions, so, be ready with some good answers.
This is another event that has brought us new members.

February 2025

Friday February 21

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Bartow Friday Fest Public
Recurs monthly

This is for anyone who wants to go to a block party. It’s o bserving and Q&A only. Solar scopes are welcome before sunset. Set up at Main St. & S Wilson Ave.
If you want to take a look around, someone will watch your scope for you. There’s usually some good food close by and music down the street.
The view is somewhat limited and there’s lots of light, but those who stop by, have some good questions, so, be ready with some good answers.
This is another event that has brought us new members.

March 2025

Friday March 21

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Bartow Friday Fest Public
Recurs monthly

This is for anyone who wants to go to a block party. It’s o bserving and Q&A only. Solar scopes are welcome before sunset. Set up at Main St. & S Wilson Ave.
If you want to take a look around, someone will watch your scope for you. There’s usually some good food close by and music down the street.
The view is somewhat limited and there’s lots of light, but those who stop by, have some good questions, so, be ready with some good answers.
This is another event that has brought us new members.

April 2025

Friday April 18

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Bartow Friday Fest Public
Recurs monthly

This is for anyone who wants to go to a block party. It’s o bserving and Q&A only. Solar scopes are welcome before sunset. Set up at Main St. & S Wilson Ave.
If you want to take a look around, someone will watch your scope for you. There’s usually some good food close by and music down the street.
The view is somewhat limited and there’s lots of light, but those who stop by, have some good questions, so, be ready with some good answers.
This is another event that has brought us new members.

May 2025

Friday May 16

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Bartow Friday Fest Public
Recurs monthly

This is for anyone who wants to go to a block party. It’s o bserving and Q&A only. Solar scopes are welcome before sunset. Set up at Main St. & S Wilson Ave.
If you want to take a look around, someone will watch your scope for you. There’s usually some good food close by and music down the street.
The view is somewhat limited and there’s lots of light, but those who stop by, have some good questions, so, be ready with some good answers.
This is another event that has brought us new members.

June 2025

Friday June 20

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Bartow Friday Fest Public
Recurs monthly

This is for anyone who wants to go to a block party. It’s o bserving and Q&A only. Solar scopes are welcome before sunset. Set up at Main St. & S Wilson Ave.
If you want to take a look around, someone will watch your scope for you. There’s usually some good food close by and music down the street.
The view is somewhat limited and there’s lots of light, but those who stop by, have some good questions, so, be ready with some good answers.
This is another event that has brought us new members.

July 2025

Friday July 18

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Bartow Friday Fest Public
Recurs monthly

This is for anyone who wants to go to a block party. It’s o bserving and Q&A only. Solar scopes are welcome before sunset. Set up at Main St. & S Wilson Ave.
If you want to take a look around, someone will watch your scope for you. There’s usually some good food close by and music down the street.
The view is somewhat limited and there’s lots of light, but those who stop by, have some good questions, so, be ready with some good answers.
This is another event that has brought us new members.

July 2024

Saturday July 27

10:51 pm
🌗 Last Quarter Moon

Sunday July 28Monday July 29

Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower

The Delta Aquarid meteor shower, active from July 12 to August 23, is best viewed in the pre-dawn hours, especially around its peak on July 28-29. While the second quarter moon may obscure fainter meteors, find yourself a dark locations after midnight for a better chance to see the brighter ones.

Favoring the Southern Hemisphere and tropical Northern Hemisphere regions like the southern U.S., this shower produces 15 to 20 meteors per hour. Originating from debris left by comets Marsden and Kracht, these meteors radiate near the star Skat in the Aquarius constellation. Unlike many showers, the Delta Aquarids don’t have a sharp peak, instead offering a steady display through late July and early August. During early August, they often coincide with the Perseids, providing an enhanced experience, particularly from southerly latitudes. Got insomnia? You’re in luck! The optimal viewing time is an hour or two before dawn.

August 2024

Thursday August 1

All Day
Lughnasadh

Lughnasadh is celebrated near the midpoint of the Summer Solstice and the Autumn Equinox (Northern Hemisphere). It observes the traditional start of the harvest season.

Sunday August 4

All Day
Mercury Retrograde Begins

Time to finish that project you’ve been putting off for years!

Mercury Retrograde is of particular interest to *astrologically* minded folks, and some people who have to deal with communications technology. See URL for more info…

7:13 am
🌑 New Moon

Monday August 12Tuesday August 13

Perseids Meteor Shower

This is one of the best showers of the year, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak. This year, a first quarter moon will block the fainter meteors, but it should set shortly after midnight, leaving you with dark skies for the rest of the show. Although the predicted peak falls during the night of August 11-12, it has a long range: from July 14 to September 1. So, you can start watching for these meteors in the early August morning hours. You can also look after the peak in August, after sunset — though the full moon will likely get in the way.

The Perseid meteor shower is perhaps the most beloved meteor shower of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. It’s a rich and steady shower. These fast and bright meteors radiate from a point in the constellation Perseus the Hero. As with all meteor shower radiant points, you don’t need to know Perseus to watch the shower. Instead, the meteors appear in all parts of the sky, frequently leaving persistent trails. Perseid meteors tend to strengthen in number from midnight to the wee hours before dawn.

These meteors are the result of our passing through the tail of Comet Swift-Tuttle. For a while, astronomers calculated that this comet would collide with the Earth during the Perseids in 2126. Such an impact would have spoiled any stargazing since the comet is the largest near-Earth object that periodically passes through our sky. If Swift-Tuttle ever does hit the Earth, its 60 km/s impact will be about 27 times more energetic than the asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs.

Monday August 12

11:19 am
🌓 First Quarter Moon

Wednesday August 14

All Day
Mars & Jupiter, Bosom Buddies

On August 14, Mars and Jupiter will have a close conjunction, only 0.3 degrees apart, visible in the constellation Taurus. This event is notable for the brightness of the planets and their minimal separation, making it the most prominent conjunction of the year. In the Northern Hemisphere, the planets will be observable from around midnight until morning, positioned high in the eastern sky. In the Southern Hemisphere, they will be visible a few hours before sunrise, also in the east.

That said, Mars won’t be very bright. We were spoiled back in 2018 when it was at its closest approach in its 15 year cycle.

Monday August 19

2:26 pm
🌕 Full Moon (Sturgeon Moon, Supermoon)

The term Sturgeon Moon refers to the full moon in August and originates from Native American tribes in North America. They named it after the sturgeon fish, which was abundant and most easily caught in the Great Lakes and other major bodies of water during this time of the year.

Ever seen a sturgeon? Living dinosaurs! This fish species dates back to the Late Cretaceous period, around 100 million years ago, making them one of the oldest surviving fish species. Google yourself some ‘great lakes sturgeon’ pictures. Weird looking, but allegedly one of the tastiest fish in the world.

Monday August 26

5:26 am
🌗 Last Quarter Moon

Wednesday August 28

All Day
Mercury Retrograde Ends

This is primarily of interest to *astrologically* minded folks. See URL for more info…

September 2024

Monday September 2

9:55 pm
🌑 New Moon

Sunday September 8Monday September 9

Saturn Crazy Bright

Saturn will be at opposition — its closest approach to Earth. It will be brighter this week than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons. A medium-sized or larger telescope will allow you to see Saturn’s rings and a few of its brightest moons.

Fun fact: Saturn’s rings are relatively new. They coalesced around the same time that trees and sharks were making their first appearance on Earth some 400 million years ago.

Wednesday September 11

2:06 am
🌓 First Quarter Moon

Tuesday September 17

10:12 pm – 11:15 pm
Partial Lunar Eclipse

Unlike the penumbral eclipse in March, this moon will pass through a section of the umbra — the darkest part of Earth’s shadow cast by the sun. Consequently, a portion of the moon’s surface will be entirely hidden from view for observers in the Americas, Africa, and Europe.

10:34 pm
🌕 Full Moon (Harvest Moon, Supermoon)

The Farmer’s Almanac described this as the Harvest Moon because it gave farmers several extra evenings of moonlight to allow them to finish their harvests before the frosts of fall arrived. Tender vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, winter squash, and pumpkins must be picked before the first frost.

It is the Harvest Moon! On gilded vanes
And roofs of villages, on woodland crests
And their aerial neighborhoods of nests
Deserted, on the curtained window-panes
Of rooms where children sleep, on country lanes
And harvest-fields, its mystic splendor rests!
Gone are the birds that were our summer guests,
With the last sheaves return the laboring wains!
All things are symbols: the external shows
Of Nature have their image in the mind,
As flowers and fruits and falling of the leaves;
The song-birds leave us at the summer’s close,
Only the empty nests are left behind,
And pipings of the quail among the sheaves.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
1807 –1882

Sunday September 22

8:44 am – 9:44 am
September Equinox

The Sun will beam down directly on the equator giving us just about equal amounts of day and night in most parts of the world. North of the equator, this is your Autumnal Equinox. If you live south of the equator, this is your Spring Equinox.

Also, try balancing an egg on its end! Whether or not you succeed has nothing to do with the Equinox, but it’s still a fun game to try on any day of the year. 🙂

Tuesday September 24

2:50 pm
🌗 Last Quarter Moon

October 2024

Tuesday October 1

All Day
Alien life on Europa?

Let’s find alien life in the waters of Jupiter’s moon, Europa! No, really, let’s have a look. NASA hasn’t announced a date yet, but October 2024 is the speculative launch window for the Europa Clipper mission. The mission aims to analyze Europa’s habitability by studying its ice shell, subsurface water, and ocean properties, assessing the ocean’s habitability through its composition and chemistry, and examining surface features and areas of high scientific interest.

Here’s a great book on the topic: ALIEN OCEANS: The search for life in the depths of space https://amzn.to/4b6erLz

Wednesday October 2

2:49 pm
🌑 New Moon
7:50 pm – 11:39 pm
Partial Solar Eclipse (Americas)

Annular solar eclipses aren’t so dramatic as total eclipses, but they’re still worth pulling out your sun-filtering goggles so you can witness a ring of light around the darkened moon in midday. The Sun’s corona will be fully hiden for those of you lurking in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of South America, parts of southern Chile, and Argentina.

Monday October 7

All Day
Draconids Meteor Shower

In 2024, a second quarter moon means dark skies in the early evening. You might also catch some meteors on subsequent days. The radiant point for the Draconid meteor shower almost coincides with the head of the constellation Draco the Dragon in the northern sky. That’s why you can view the Draconids best from the Northern Hemisphere. The Draconid shower is a real oddity, in that the radiant point stands highest in the sky as darkness falls. That means that, unlike many meteor showers, more Draconids are likely to fly in the evening hours than in the morning hours after midnight. This shower is usually a sleeper, producing only a handful of languid meteors per hour in most years. But watch out if the Dragon awakes! In rare instances, fiery Draco has been known to spew forth many hundreds of meteors in a single hour.

The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900.

Thursday October 10

2:55 pm
🌓 First Quarter Moon

Thursday October 17

7:26 am
🌕 Full Moon (Hunters Moon, Supermoon)

This is the closest supermoon of the 4 supermoons in 2024.

Known as the Hunters Moon because at this time of year the leaves are falling and the game is fat and ready to hunt.

Monday October 21Tuesday October 22

Orionids Meteor Shower

In 2024, the waning gibbous moon will block out the fainter meteors.

On a dark, moonless night, the Orionids exhibit a maximum of about 10 to 20 meteors per hour, peaking on the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd.

These fast-moving meteors sometimes produce bright fireballs, which might be able to overcome a moonlit glare. If you trace these meteors backward, they seem to radiate from the Club of the famous constellation Orion the Hunter.

The Orionids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times.

Thursday October 24

4:03 am
🌗 Last Quarter Moon

November 2024

Friday November 1

All Day
Samhain

Samhain marks the last of the year’s four cross-quarter festivals in the Wheel of the Year, celebrated by many in Neopagan and Wiccan traditions. Positioned between the Autumn Equinox and the Winter Solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, it serves as a time to honor and remember the deceased.

8:47 am
🌑 New Moon

Monday November 4Wednesday November 6

(Possible) Taurid Fireball Meteor Shower

The Taurid meteor shower, which includes both Southern and Northern Taurids, is known for its long duration, typically lasting from September 28 to December 2, but it generally offers only about five meteors per hour even at its peak. The Taurids are notable for a high percentage of fireballs, or exceptionally bright meteors. In 2022, an increased rate of fireball activity, known as the Taurid swarm, was observed, likely due to Jupiter’s gravitational influence on the debris in Earth’s path. This type of thing seems to happen every seven years or so…

The best viewing times for the Taurids are typically around midnight, when the constellation Taurus is highest in the sky. The meteors, which can be slow-moving but occasionally very bright, are best viewed in the mornings before the peak, as the moon gets fuller each night after.

The Taurids are unusual in having two separate streams: one produced by debris from Asteroid 2004 TG10 and the other from Comet 2P Encke.

Saturday November 9

12:56 am
🌓 First Quarter Moon

Friday November 15

4:29 pm
🌕 Full Moon (Kartik Purnima 2024)

Kartik Purnima, a revered festival in Hinduism, is celebrated on the full moon day of the Hindu month of Kartik. This festival holds great significance as it commemorates Lord Shiva’s triumph over the demon Tripurasura, and is also associated with Lord Krishna’s defeat of the demon Narakasura.

The festival is not only important for its religious connotations but also for its astronomical aspects. On Kartik Purnima, the moon is exceptionally bright and nearest to the Earth (SUPERMOON!) creating an ideal setting for worship and meditation. This auspicious day symbolizes the victory of good over evil and provides an opportunity to admire the moon’s splendor and ponder its spiritual importance.

Sunday November 17Monday November 18

Leonids Meteor Shower

A nearly full moon will outshine all but the brightest Leonid meteors this year. For the best view, find a very dark spot and watch after midnight.

Here’s a bit of history: The Leonids, typically an average shower, occasionally produces extraordinary meteor storms. In 1966, observers witnessed thousands of meteors per minute during a spectacular 15-minute period on November 17. Meteors seemed to fall like rain, all streaming from the constellation Leo the Lion. This event left a lasting impression of Earth moving through space, amidst a dense meteor stream. While Leonid meteor storms recur approximately every 33 to 34 years, recent occurrences haven’t matched the intensity of 1966. Usually, the Leonids peak at 10-15 meteors per hour and are most active after midnight, with the highest numbers just before dawn.

The Leonids are unique for their roughly 33-year cyclonic peak, with the last major event in 2001. (So maybe mark your calendars for November 2033?) The shower, resulting from dust grains left by comet Tempel-Tuttle, discovered in 1865, runs annually from November 6-30. While meteors radiate from Leo, they can be seen across the sky.

Friday November 22

8:28 pm
🌗 Last Quarter Moon

Monday November 25

All Day
Mercury Retrograde Begins

Reorganize! Declutter! Repair broken things and put on a fresh coat of paint!

Mercury Retrograde is of particular interest to *astrologically* minded folks, and some people who have to deal with communications technology. See URL for more info…

December 2024

Sunday December 1

1:21 am
🌑 New Moon

Saturday December 7

All Day
Jupiter Crazy Bright

Jupiter will be at opposition — its nearest point to Earth this year, making it exceptionally bright and visible throughout the entire night. This event offers the optimal opportunity to observe and photograph Jupiter, along with its moons. With a medium-sized telescope, you can view details in Jupiter’s cloud bands. Using a good pair of binoculars, you should be able to spot the four largest moons of Jupiter, known as the Galilean moons (discovered by Galileo Galilei in 1610), appearing as distinct bright spots on either side of the planet. Beyond these, astronomers have discovered 76 more Jovain moons since Galileo’s time.

Sunday December 8

10:27 am
🌓 First Quarter Moon

Friday December 13Saturday December 14

Geminids King Meteor Shower

Bummer! A nearly full moon will interfere with viewing of this show. Plonk yourself somewhere dark after midnight and you might still see some good shooting stars.

The bold, bright white and slow moving Geminids give us one of the Northern Hemisphere’s best showers. They’re also visible, at lower rates, from the Southern Hemisphere. The meteors are plentiful, rivaling the August Perseids.

You can watch the usually reliable and prolific Geminid meteor shower from evening December 13, with the best views probably just before or around midnight. Under a dark sky with no moon, you might catch 120 Geminid meteors per hour.

Most meteor showers are the result of us passing though comet trails. These meteors are the debris left behind by an *asteroid* known as 3200 Phaethon, discovered in 1982. The shower runs annually from December 7-17. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Sunday December 15

All Day
Mercury Retrograde Ends

This is primarily of interest to *astrologically* minded folks. See URL for more info…

4:02 am
🌕 Full Moon (Bitter Moon)

Brr! The December full moon is also known as the Ice Moon, Snow Moon, Long Nights Moon, and my favorite (from the Cree), Frost Exploding Trees Moon

Saturday December 21Sunday December 22

Ursids Meteor Shower

The waning gibbous moon will block out the fainter meteors this year.

The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing about 5-10 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tuttle, which was first discovered in 1790. The shower runs annually from December 17-25. It peaks this year on the the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Saturday December 21

4:21 am – 5:21 am
December solstice

This marks the beginning of winter (in the northern hemisphere) and the beginning of summer (in the southern hemisphere.) The winter solstice is the shortest day of the year, respectively, in the sense that the length of time elapsed between sunrise and sunset on this day is a minimum for the year. Of course, daylight saving time means that the first Sunday in April has 23 hours and the last Sunday in October has 25 hours, but these human meddlings with the calendar and do not correspond to the actual number of daylight hours.

If you live in the southern hemisphere, this is your Summer Solstice, and good cause for celebrating the longest day of the year.

Sunday December 22

5:18 pm
🌗 Last Quarter Moon

Monday December 30

5:27 pm
🌑 New Moon

January 2025

Wednesday January 1

All Day
HAPPY NEW YEAR from your Astronomy Calendar

This event is in your calendar because at some point you subscribed to Canton Becker’s moon and astronomical events calendar. If you are reading this and you do not see any moon phases in 2025, you may need to resubscribe. If you use Google Calendar I strongly recommend you un-subscribe and re-subscribe each year as that service tends to not update itself very well.

https://cantonbecker.com/astronomy-calendar/

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